Author Topic: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB  (Read 150457 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline ayrdons

  • Bench Warmer
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
  • Rating: 4
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #160 on: October 02, 2008, 08:51:39 AM »
Danny Wallace - friends like these , good holiday read !
see me , see the sea , i love the sea me

Offline tlg1903

  • Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 4483
  • Rating: 55
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #161 on: October 02, 2008, 11:53:06 AM »
Danny Wallace - friends like these , good holiday read !

I've read join me and yes man, is this of similar calibre?
Decided to start a football blog, feel free to have a read here.

http://foxintheboxon.blogspot.co.uk/?view=flipcard

Offline Kowalski

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 14637
  • Rating: -13
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #162 on: October 02, 2008, 11:27:59 PM »
Anyone read this?


Offline rocket_scientist

  • Club Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 6574
  • Rating: -200
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #163 on: October 02, 2008, 11:36:05 PM »
Anyone read this?


Read it? I fucking wrote it. Watch & Learn.
Ancient Sound, Modern Noise

Offline Edinburghdon

  • Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 4622
  • Rating: -12
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #164 on: October 02, 2008, 11:38:09 PM »
Anyone read this?



Shortest book ever?

Chapter 1 "I'm ALWAYS right, you don't count!"

Offline rocket_scientist

  • Club Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 6574
  • Rating: -200
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #165 on: October 02, 2008, 11:47:14 PM »
Shortest book ever?

Chapter 1 "I'm ALWAYS right, you don't count!"

Never in the history of the internet has there been evidence to back you up.

For a start, with fitba forums being as they are, anyone can post as much or as frequently as they like.

If some are bludgeoned into an early grave, then they were wrong in the first place, or they failed to get enough support.

Confidence in having a view is a good thing, surely?

The insecurity of others in not challenging a view is another matter altogether.
Ancient Sound, Modern Noise

Offline ayrdons

  • Bench Warmer
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
  • Rating: 4
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #166 on: October 03, 2008, 01:07:24 PM »
Friends like these by Danny Wallace - really good book , easy to read and very funny , ive actually just went out and bought his other two books , Join me and Yes man , started to read join me and i can say that Freinds like these is in the same vein , definately recomend it .
see me , see the sea , i love the sea me

Offline bilbobaggins

  • Midfield Maestro
  • ****
  • Posts: 2275
  • Rating: 37
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #167 on: October 03, 2008, 01:55:52 PM »
I just finished Christopher Brookmyre, one fine day in the middle of the night. He's a laugh out loud author and I'll be reading the rest of his work ASAP.

Since I had nothing else I'm digging Kerouac's On The Road, again, Ah mmm.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2008, 02:00:27 PM by bilbobaggins »
SupercalifragilisticBorussiaMuenchenGladbach

Offline BigAl

  • SAGA Subscriber
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 12003
  • Rating: 204
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #168 on: October 05, 2008, 08:27:09 PM »
"An Ordinary Man" The True Story Behind Hotel Rwanda by Paul Ruseseabagina.
Superb account of the history of the historical events leading up to the 1994 genocide in this country, together with more detail behind how this remarkable man protected and saved the lifes of nearly 1300 of his countrymen.

Highly recommended :thumbsup:
Steve warm his seat up

Offline tom_widdows

  • Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 4723
  • Rating: 39
  • Miserable CĂșnt & Architectural Killjoy
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #169 on: October 05, 2008, 09:04:49 PM »
Close to finishing Quintine jardine's latest - Aftershock
As usual after a slow start and middle its getting good towards the end.

Jardin is  ok but I dont find his main character Bob Skinner as compelling as Rebus.
Probably because hes an ACC and everyone loves him as opposed to rebus the Drunken DI who gets the job done his own way and usually against his superiors wishes.

Disappointed that Rankin wont be writing any more Rebus books. Have read them all and his other books just dont 'have it'

Soon as ive finished this one its back to searching out a cheap copy of 'Flesh House' (Macbride) or maybe even Brookmyre's latest ' A snowball in hell'

Recently read a couple of James Patterson's too. Nice and easy
I'm a man, and as a man I crave disappointment.

That's why I support Aberdeen Football Club & Scotland.

Offline Superstar Tradesman

  • Club Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 6637
  • Rating: 15
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #170 on: October 06, 2008, 11:27:03 AM »
Since I had nothing else I'm digging Kerouac's On The Road, again, Ah mmm.

I bought this in City Lights Bookstore in San Fran and left the fucking thing on a bus about 10 minutes later.  Returned the next day to buy another copy and managed to leave it on the plane, unopened, later that day.  I've never got round to testing the 'third time lucky' theory.

Recently I read a Johnny Cash biography which was quite nicely written.  I think he's written one before so this one he writes whilst on the road and only skips through his history from time to time focusing more on the main characters in his life.  I really enjoyed it as it was him, as an old man looking back, reflecting on his life and he sort of knew there wasn't much left in the tank but he wasn't regretting any of it.  He'd found peace with himself (man).

At the moment I'm reading Hannibal Rising by the Silence of the Lambs author Thomas Harris.  It tracks his up-bringing and goes a fair way to explaining why he became the serial killer with a taste for human flesh.  Think I read Silence years ago but I'll probably go back and read these in order now as this has been a good read.

Also bought a book called Elephants on Acid whilst passing through the airport yesterday.  My brain was a little fried after the weekend so I thought I'd best pick up something that was easy to read.  It's a catalogue of all the weird, strange and amusing experiments that scientists have done.

Offline bazig

  • First Team Regular
  • ****
  • Posts: 568
  • Rating: 3
  • Observing the slaying of angry panthers.
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #171 on: October 10, 2008, 09:13:45 AM »
Stuart MacBride's Sawbones reads like My First Fisherprice Crime Story. Not good.

Offline baggy89

  • Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 3122
  • Rating: 42
  • God forgives, I don't.
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #172 on: October 10, 2008, 09:45:03 AM »
I finished Ghost after being inspired here, flew through it, another good Harris book easy to see who some of the characters are loosely based on.

Didn't fly through it quite as quick as I did The Road when I gave that another go, difficult to understand how the boy could be compassionate about other human beings when all he has ever experienced was kill or be killed, but I suppose that was the point of the story. I didn't quite get the bit about the fish at the end, was it trying to say that there were places where the world was habitable and food was plentiful, or is it referring back to a time in the past? Or am I taking it a bit to literally.

Also read Graeme Obree's autobiography, I never realised how fucked up an individual he is, not surprising given his childhood and that so many people close to him lost their lives. Towards the end I kept thinking of Rocket Scientists rant about how people were either mentally strong and winners or mentally weak and losers. Obree in no way could be classed as a loser; two time world hour record holder, and two time world pursuit champion. I suppose you could argue that he could have achieved more if it hadn't been for psychological troubles but at the same time I think if it wasn't for his "demons" he would never have pushed himself as far or as hard as he did. Well worth a read anyway if only to discover a true Scottish sporting hero.

Offline bazig

  • First Team Regular
  • ****
  • Posts: 568
  • Rating: 3
  • Observing the slaying of angry panthers.
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #173 on: October 10, 2008, 09:53:51 AM »
Quote
I didn't quite get the bit about the fish at the end, was it trying to say that there were places where the world was habitable and food was plentiful, or is it referring back to a time in the past?
I took the trout to be just a memory.

Offline Harcus

  • Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 3019
  • Rating: 9
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #174 on: October 10, 2008, 10:25:44 AM »
First up, may I recommend Gary Sutherland's "Hunting Grounds":
http://www.play.com/Books/Books/4-/3370157/Hunting-Grounds/Product.html
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hunting-Grounds-Gary-Sutherland/dp/1841585866/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1198166624&sr=8-1

Its an excellent journey round all 42 Scottish fitba grounds in one season.  Detailing transport, pre-match venues for a pint, the quality of the pies at the ground, and a review of the performance of both the players and the fans.  He goes into some depth in his report for each ground.  Its rather witty too!

He obviously visits Pittodrie (2-2 cup game with Hibs last season), and also a Falkirk v Aberdeen SPL game where the away fans are praised.

I was in the sport section of my local library and picked this up. While I found it OK, I would have preferred more of a 'story', and his wit was getting on my tits by the end.

Also read 'Those Feet' by David Winner, which was very interesting, charting the changing nature of English society alongside its style of football.

Currently reading Bill Murray's 'Old Firm' updated edition, which is very enjoyable. Have reached up until 1984 so far.

Next up is Bobby George's autobiography.  ;D


Offline smooth

  • Bench Warmer
  • ***
  • Posts: 168
  • Rating: 4
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #175 on: October 10, 2008, 01:35:30 PM »
I just finished Christopher Brookmyre, one fine day in the middle of the night. He's a laugh out loud author and I'll be reading the rest of his work ASAP.



if you liked this try.... Carl Hiassen, a better, american version.  Or Colin Batemen, an Irish version of similar quality
bigger than hitler better than christ

Offline Kowalski

  • Global Moderator
  • ****
  • Posts: 14637
  • Rating: -13
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #176 on: October 15, 2008, 10:27:14 PM »
Just away to start reading "17" by the great Bill Drummond.

Offline TENEMENTFUNSTER

  • Manager
  • ******
  • Posts: 14337
  • Rating: 238
  • Prancing about naked, bold as brass!
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #177 on: October 15, 2008, 11:02:33 PM »
Just about finished Terry Pratchett - Nation, pretty good as ever! :thumbsup:
Moaning faced, tight-fisted, Aberdonian cunts!

Tuckers Law - If some cunt can fuck something up that cunt will pick the worst possible time to fucking fuck it up because that cunt's a cunt!

Offline rocket_scientist

  • Club Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 6574
  • Rating: -200
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #178 on: October 15, 2008, 11:08:53 PM »
Also read Graeme Obree's autobiography, I never realised how fucked up an individual he is, not surprising given his childhood and that so many people close to him lost their lives. Towards the end I kept thinking of Rocket Scientists rant about how people were either mentally strong and winners or mentally weak and losers.

Never consider thinking about anything I post. I just make it up as I go along. I can't even remember what you're referring to. Sounds typically and ignorantly black and white they way you're recalling it, another surefire clue to ignore it.

On Books, I am away to start One Arrow, One Life by Kenneth Kushner. It's been recommended by a friend who's previous two recommnedations I was unable to finish. Love his persistence and enthusaism though, and his bouncebackability. He is convinced I'm going to find his reading material as inspired he does. I hope so too.
Ancient Sound, Modern Noise

Offline baggy89

  • Captain
  • ****
  • Posts: 3122
  • Rating: 42
  • God forgives, I don't.
Re: THE DONSTALK BOOK CLUB
« Reply #179 on: October 15, 2008, 11:58:36 PM »
Never consider thinking about anything I post. I just make it up as I go along. I can't even remember what you're referring to. Sounds typically and ignorantly black and white they way you're recalling it, another surefire clue to ignore it.

On Books, I am away to start One Arrow, One Life by Kenneth Kushner. It's been recommended by a friend who's previous two recommnedations I was unable to finish. Love his persistence and enthusaism though, and his bouncebackability. He is convinced I'm going to find his reading material as inspired he does. I hope so too.

I think it was more the balck and white nature oft he comment that I was thinking about rather than the comment itself. Obree's narrative, to me, seemed to suggest he felt that the focus of going for the records and gold medals kept his demons at bay. It didn't seem to me like he acknowledged that those same demons gave him the ability to push himself further that most other human beings would have been capable of. A "I don't care if I live or die attitude" that he seems to acknowledge at various other points in the story of his life.

I wonder if its the solitudinal aspect of the sport that seems to predispose participants to psychological problems or if thats what attracts those who are predisposed to psychological problems to the sport?